LIFT STATION REPAIRS AND MONTHLY INSPECTIONS

LIFT STATION REPAIRS

AND MONTHLY INSPECTIONS

CALL -352-335-8555   FOR   A  FREE  ESTIMATE

WHAT IS A LIFT STATION?

Wastewater lift stations are facilities designed to move wastewater from lower to higher elevation, particularly where the elevation of the source is not sufficient for gravity flow and/or when the use of gravity conveyance will result in excessive excavation depths and high sewer construction costs.

Key elements of lift stations include a wastewater receiving well (wet-well), often equipped with a screen or grinding to remove coarse materials; pumps and piping with associated valves; motors; a power supply system; an equipment control and alarm system; and an odor control system and ventilation system.  Lift station equipment and systems are often installed in an enclosed structure. They can be constructed on-site (custom-designed) or prefabricated.

Lift stations are used to reduce the capital cost of sewer system construction.  When gravity sewers are installed in trenches deeper than three meters (10 feet), the cost of sewer line installation increases significantly because of the more complex and costly excavation equipment and trench shoring techniques required.  The size of the gravity sewer lines is dependent on the minimum pipe slope and flow.  Pumping wastewater can convey the same flow using smaller pipeline size at shallower depth, and thereby, reducing pipeline costs.

United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water Washington, D.C. EPA 832-F-00-073 September 2000 Collection Systems Technology Fact Sheet Sewers, Lift Station

 

———————————————————————————-

LIFT STATION REPAIRS

AND MONTHLY INSPECTIONS

CALL -352-335-8555   FOR   A  FREE  ESTIMATE

————————————————————————————-

WE DO – EMERGENCY RESPONSE

WE DO – MONTHLY SERVICE

WE DO – PUMP-OUTS

WE DO – REPAIRS

WE DO – INTALLATIONS

WE DO – CODE UPGRADES

WHEN IT COMES TO LIFT STATIONS:

WE DO – IT ALL!!

WHERE LIFT STATION SERVICE IS JOB #1

 

———————————————————————————-

LIFT STATION REPAIRS

AND MONTHLY INSPECTIONS

CALL -352-335-8555   FOR   A  FREE  ESTIMATE

————————————————————————————-

Submersible Pump Repair/Replacement – Float Switch Replacement – Control Panel Repair – Trench Drain Clean-out – Pressure Washing – Odor Control

PROVIDING FAST, PROFESSIONAL SERVICE TO SEWAGE LIFT STATIONS IN WEST CENTRAL FLORIDA.  SEWAGE PUMP STATIONS, LIFT STATION REPAIR, LIFT STATION MAINTENANCE, SERVICE WORK, CONTROL PANEL, WET WELL, GRINDER PUMPS, VORTEX PUMPS, MYERS PUMPS, EBARA PUMPS, ELECTRIC PUMPS, EFFLUENT PUMPS, WASTE WATER PUMPS, LIFT STATION FAILURE, LIFT STATION SERVICE, PUMP STATION REPAIR, PUMP STATION SERVICE

The existing wastewater collection systems for the Utility Solutions (US) service areas include infrastructure located in Grove Subdivision, star Subdivision,  Park Subdivision, bow Subdivision,  Creek Parklands Subdivision, k Bull Subdivision, n Heights Subdivision and adjoining properties. All US gravity sewer infrastructure was installed between 2000 and 2008 and consists of modern materials including PVC sewer mains with four foot diameter manholes. To ensure proper construction of those improvements, the sewers were installed according to engineered plans and specifications and tested according to Montana Public Works Standard Specifications. The sewer mains were sized to handle flows from their respective subdivisions and adjoining properties. Any additional flows that may materialize for an existing main will come from future projects and will be subject to US and MDEQ review prior to approval.

gravity sewer mains drain into an existing lift station located at the edge of the wastewater facility property. The lift station consists of a buried concrete vault with at-grade self-priming centrifugal pumps. It was designed to handle the area associated with  Grove Subdivision and its neighbors. The lift station connects to a HDPE forcemain leading directly to the treatment plant. All other US gravity sewer mains drain to lift stations located at strategic points throughout the wastewater service area. Each lift station consists of buried concrete wet well and valve vault structures. The wet well contains rail mounted submersible pumps that can be removed without entry into the structure. The valve vaults house check valves, manual valves, and flow meters. Each lift station connects to HDPE or PVC forcemain piping that leads to the next upstream lift station and eventually empties to the treatment plant. The lift Station design capacities are shown

 

Usage Standards
Based on metered data, a typical residence uses 160 gallons of water per day in non-irrigating months. This averages to 4,800 gallons of indoor water usage each month.

Irrigation studies have determined typical turf grass has a water consumption rate of 1.32 acre-feet over 153 days of irrigation. With losses from sprinkler irrigation and adjustments for elevation, the application rate becomes about 1.55 acre-feet. This means for a 1/3 acre property (14,520 square feet) with 40% lawn, on average the most water needed is 440 gallons per day.  This amount is higher on hotter days and lower on cooler days. This averages to 13,200 gallons per month of irrigation usage.

Typical indoor water use: (Sources: American Water, Maryland Department of the Enviroment)

Toilet: 5-6 gallons per flush
Bathtub: 30 gallons (half full)
Shower: 5 gallons per minute
Faucet: 3 gallons per minute
Laundry: 40-55 gallons per load (top load models)
21-25 gallons per load (front load models)
Dishwasher: 8-12 gallons per load

Checking For Leaks
Leaks, even seemingly small, can generate large amounts of water loss. A toilet with a worn or warped flapper can lose 200 or more gallons per day. A leaky faucet or showerhead can lose 3,000 gallons or more each year. (Source: Environmental Protection Agency)

The quickest way to check if you have a leak is to check if water is moving into the house. First, turn off all the water inside and outside the house. Also make sure no appliances that use water are running. Next, locate your water meter. These are typically located in a basement or crawl space. On the face of the meter is a red dial. If the dial is spinning, there is water being used or lost.

product_01b_pic_03.jpg
Water Meter

To check if a toilet is leaking, place a few drops of food coloring in the tank. If in a few minutes coloring shows up in the toilet bowl, there is a leak that needs to be repaired. Check for wet spots or stains under or behind dishwashers or washing machines to see if these appliances are leaking. (Source: American Water)

Wise Water Use
Reducing the amount of household water use saves both water and money. There are many ways in which you can reduce the amount of water used in your household.

  • Only run a dishwasher when full and use water-saver cycle when available.
  • Only run full loads or adjust water level to match load size when doing laundry.
  • Do not let water run while you brush your teeth or shave.
  • Take shorter showers.
  • Replace faucets and showerheads with low-flow models.
  • Replace toilets with new water saving models or retrofit old toilets with water-saving devices.
  • Regularly check for leaks.
  • Water your lawn or garden in the coolest part of the day and only when needed.

Leave a Reply

PLUMBING PUMPS LIFT STATIONS POOL REPAIR